Why Are Elderly At Greater Risk With Flu?

Why Are Elderly At Greater Risk With Flu?

When compared to young, healthy individuals, people over the age of 65 are at a larger risk of experiencing significant flu complications than those under the age of 65. This higher risk is partly attributable to changes in immune defenses that occur as a result of growing older.

What age group is most affected by the flu?

  • According to the same CID study, children are the most likely to become ill from influenza, while those over the age of 65 are the least likely to become ill from influenza.
  • Children aged 0-17 years had a 9.3 percent incidence rate, adults aged 18-64 years had an 8.8 percent attack rate, and adults aged 65 years and above had a 3.9 percent attack rate, according to the median incidence values (or attack rates).

Who are at greater risk with influenza?

Young children, pregnant women and postpartum women up to 2 weeks after delivery, older adults, people with certain chronic medical conditions, people who live in nursing homes, and members of certain racial and ethnic minority groups are all considered to be at increased risk of complications from influenza.

Who usually dies from the flu?

Toddlers under the age of five (particularly children under two) and people over the age of 65 are at the greatest risk of suffering serious flu complications, being hospitalized, and dying. Children under the age of 18 who are using aspirin or salicylate-based drugs are among those who are at high risk of dying from the influenza virus.

Why is flu problematic in immunocompromised individuals?

It has been proposed that patients with compromised immune defenses experience higher rates of influenza infection and complication rates than the general population. A variety of biological processes, ranging from uncommon congenital immunodeficiencies to more prevalent reasons, such as immunosuppressive medicines or HIV infection, can result in immunosuppression in the body.

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Which groups are at highest risk for influenza select all that apply?

Flu-related complications, hospitalizations, and fatalities are most common among adults 65 years and older, children less than 5 years, pregnant women, and persons of any age who have medical problems that put them at higher risk for influenza-related complications, hospitalizations, and deaths.

What time of year is influenza at its peak?

The flu season in the United States occurs between the fall and winter months. In spite of the fact that influenza viruses may spread all year, most of the time, flu activity peaks between December and February, but activity can extend as late as May.

Why do flu shots only last a year?

Due to the rapid evolution of flu viruses, the vaccination you received last year may not provide adequate protection against this year’s viruses. Every year, new influenza vaccinations are introduced to keep up with the constantly evolving flu viruses. Following a vaccination, your immune system generates antibodies that protect you against the viruses that are included in the vaccination.

What happens if an immunocompromised person gets the flu?

Researchers have discovered that patients who are immunocompromised are at higher risk for more severe influenza sickness, which looks to be more difficult to avoid and cure. The findings were published in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases.

Who are immunocompromised?

You might hear the terms ‘immunocompromised’ and ‘immunosuppressed’ thrown about when people are talking about COVID-19 and immunizations. Persons with compromised immune systems are referred to by any of these terms.

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What is the chance of getting the flu?

5 percent to 20% — The average annual rate of influenza infection in the United States’ population is between 5 and 20%. 200,000 — The average number of Americans who are admitted to hospitals each year as a result of complications from their sickness.

Alice Sparrow

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